Class: Botany

This is the first class I started with Sheridan Samano, and the most recent one that I finished. It is usually held over an eight-week period, but with her more intense travel schedule, it was condensed to eight classes in four weeks. To be honest, two classes each week probably helped me on the quiz we started each class with, since it hadn’t been a full week since I had learned the information.

This class, even more than the ecology class, felt like a college class. There was a lot of information to cover, and we even had a text book. I recommend Brian Capon’s Botany for Gardeners to anyone that is interested in the why behind the how of gardening. It is accessible without being shallow, and is small enough to not intimidate. There were a couple of corrections to the book that we got in class. The favorite color of bees is yellow, not purple and blue, and there are more than four hormones that we now understand. We talked about a fifth, briefly, but apparently the number keeps growing.

Botany is an under-studied and under-researched field. Sheridan herself got into it kind of sideways, since her first interest is birds. She started learning about botany to better understand the birds’ locations and habits. Being a botanist isn’t a show-stopper of a career like a marine biologist or an avian biologist. After all, they’re just plants, right? How exciting could that possibly be? It turns out, even if you don’t take into account carnivorous plants, it can be quite exciting.  Everyone should remember from their middle-school and highschool science classes that plants are the primary producers. They are the organisms that take sunlight and make food that every other organism uses one way or another. The ways that they have found to survive and thrive in all sorts of environments to continue to do so are fascinating.

We all know that plants have been around for a long time. There are four classes of plants: Bryophytes (moss), Pterophytes (ferns), Gymnosperms (“naked seeds”), and Angiosperms (“vessel seeds”). Bryophytes, or non-vascular plants, are the oldest. Angiosperms are both the newest and the most prolific. They are also mostly what we use in our gardens. After all, the bulk of gardening is done for flowers and for fruit (technically just a fertilized ovary) which are only found in this class.

The variety found in plants is both fascinating, and potentially challenging. Anyone who gardens has run across the fact that some things just won’t grow in some locations. With this class, those locations have gone from large areas to very small ones. Don’t plant native Colorado plants in what used to be your vegetable garden. Their death will have nothing to do with elevation, water, or sunlight. It will have everything to do with the fact that they are designed for a harsh environment, not the lush richness required by vegetables. Don’t plant broad-leaved, shade-loving plants in a sunny spot around here. That death will have everything to do with the sun. When choosing indoor plants, bear in mind that most commercial houseplants are tropical plants that grow in the shade. They can handle the limited sun of a house without growing toward any sun they can find.

As with anything, the more I learn, the more I find that I don’t know. However, this class was a fantastic start to understand the whys behind so many gardening hows. Also, as long as you aren’t a Poison fan, here’s a conversation-starter for you. Every rose does not, in fact, have its thorn. They have prickles.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Nice summary. I’ve seen the book; reading your summary made me think that maybe I need a botany refresher after all!

    Reply

    • There’s so much to learn! This class was fantastic for a beginner like me and for people that are just interested in it as it applies to a garden. Being a nerd, I’m thinking there will be many more such classes in my future.

      Reply

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